Salve! Bene venisti, amice.

Summer Schools of Living Latin and Greek have been organized at our university for 20 years, so far over 500 people from all over the world have participated in them.

This year's summer school will be held online on this website. Below you will find a list of courses.

This is a group for absolute beginners. The course is based on Familia Romana by Hans Ørberg, starting from chapter 1.

Tirones II— this course is for elementary students and is based on book Familia Romana by H. Ørberg (starting with Chapter IX). Apart from reading, students will be able to develope their Latin speaking and writting skills, learn to talk about themselves, describe everyday activities and have simple conversations. It is recommended to be familiar with the vocabulary and grammar of previous Chapters I-VIII.

Tirones III—for pre-intermediate students with knowledge of Latin basics—this course is based on book Familia Romana by H. Ørberg (starting with Chapter XX). Also students will read other authors e.x. Caesar and develop their writing and speaking skill.

This course is based on anthology Sermones Romani edited by Hans Orberg. We are going to read excerpts from Plautus, Cicero, Phaedrus and historians as well as Hermeneumata of the Pseudo-Dositheus. Many of these texts have the form of dialogues to offer students the finest examples of Latin conversations composed by the ancient authors. Auxiliary reading materials will be Fabulae Syrae and De viris illustribus urbis Romae.

In this course, we follow the well-known “varietas delectat” principle. We will discuss a wide variety of topics in Latin in order to expand your “copia verborum”, write and tell stories, describe pictures, read interesting short texts, and practice important aspects of the Latin language in a lively and playful way through a number of games and exercises. As a common thread we will read, and especially listen to, the highly entertaining Latin novel “Ad Alpes”. Venite quam plurimi!

This group is intended for false beginners or middle-level beginners with some elementary knowledge of ancient Greek. We will use Ἀθήνᾱζε (Italian edition) as the base text for the lessons, starting on chapter 6. Students should be already at least passively familiar with the declension (first and second, personal pronouns), as well as with some forms of of εἰμί and of the active voice of verbs in -ω/-άω/-έω (present tense of the indicative mood, present imperative, present infinitive). If you have at least passive knowledge of that grammar, welcome to the group!

 

First, we will review basic grammar and vocabulary while introducing ourselves and the story contained in the previous chapters of the book. Then you will be gradually taken deeper into learning the language by using it.

This group is intended for advanced beginners with some knowledge of ancient Greek. We will use Ἀθήνᾱζε (Italian edition) as the base text for the lessons, starting on chapter 12. Students should be already at least passively familiar with the declensions and personal and reflexive pronouns, as well as with some forms of εἰμί and of the active and middle voice of verbs in -ω/-άω/-έω (present and aorist of the indicative mood, present and aorist infinitive, imperative and participle). If you have at least passive knowledge of that grammar, welcome to the group!

 

First, we will review some grammar and vocabulary while introducing ourselves and the story contained in the previous chapters of the book. Then you will be gradually taken deeper into learning the language by using it.

This group is directed to higher-intermediate and advanced students with fairly proficient knowledge of ancient Greek. The course will be based on excerpts from original Greek texts, mainly ancient plays (tragedy and comedy), combined with original exercises in advanced thematic vocabulary and advanced morphology drills. It will also provide students with useful expressions for Greek conversation on more advanced topics. All participants must be familiar with the main inflexion system (nominal and verbal) and have enough vocabulary to handle Greek theatrical texts from the Classical period (choral strophes not included).